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The Health of the Bay

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The Health of the Bay

The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science released their annual health report and score for the Chesapeake Bay. The report focuses on 2013, and awards the Chesapeake a C, the same score as last year. Although the lower Bay has seen some progress, the estuary overall needs more help. The primary limiting factor for stream health again seems to be nutrient and sediment pollution from stormwater runoff.

Recycling the Leftovers

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Recycling the Leftovers

This past weekend the New York Times had a piece about recycling food waste from restaurants, college dining areas, and other businesses associated with food production. The article focused on efforts to reduce food waste through composting, or donating leftovers to food banks. Cities, such as Austin, Texas, and colleges, such as Dickinson College in Pennsylvania, are participating in programs where food waste is being recycled into compost for fertilizer. Dickinson is unique in that it owns and operates a college farm, where waste from dining services can be composted and used to fertilize crops (which are then used in the school cafeteria).

Using food waste for compost, or donating leftovers to food banks, can reduce the millions of tons of waste sent to American landfills each year from restaurants, households, and the food production industry.

Great News for Chesapeake Oysters

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Great News for Chesapeake Oysters

According to the Maryland 2013 Fall Oyster Survey, released by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the oyster population in the state is at the highest its been since 1985. Last year’s harvest was over 400,000 bushels, and the oyster survival rate has risen to 92% with the development of disease resistant larvae.

Related: Maryland Department of Natural Resources Press Release

Market Based Approaches to Reduce Nitrogen Runoff

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Market Based Approaches to Reduce Nitrogen Runoff

The Maryland Sea Grant, a research program out of the University of Maryland, publishes a magazine, Chesapeake Quarterly, on environmental issues in the Chesapeake Bay region. In April they featured a story on water quality trading in the Chesapeake watershed. Water quality trading can take place between farmers and cities, where farmers plant cover crops and adopt other practices to reduce nitrogen runoff, and in return can receive financial grants from local wastewater treatment plants, for example. So far, water quality trading has not been very successful in the area, in terms of participation. The article, “Trading Away Toward a Cleaner Bay,” examines why this is the case, and looks at other market based approaches to limit nitrogen runoff into the Chesapeake Bay.

Rise in Shad Returning to Potomac River

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Rise in Shad Returning to Potomac River

The Chesapeake Bay Program had a piece today on the rising numbers of shad returning to the Potomac River. A return of native fish to the region can signify an improvement in water quality conditions.

A Chesapeake Homecoming

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A Chesapeake Homecoming

A recent piece from the New York Times on the Chesapeake oyster industry

Winter Rains May Predict Oyster Success

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Winter Rains May Predict Oyster Success

Scientists with the Maryland Sea Grant are studying the relationship between oyster abundance and winter climate. Their findings could help predict oyster success, dependent on winter rains and average seasonal temperatures.